voiceofnature:

Valais blacknosed sheep. Although the earliest mention of it dates back to 1400, this large, docile mountain sheep was first recognised as a separate breed in 1962. It has adapted particularly well to life in the high Swizz mountains and grazes even on the steepest, stoniest slopes. The black patches on its nose, eyes, ears, knees, hocks and feet and otherwise light woolly coats make it quite unmistakeable.
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voiceofnature:

Valais blacknosed sheep. Although the earliest mention of it dates back to 1400, this large, docile mountain sheep was first recognised as a separate breed in 1962. It has adapted particularly well to life in the high Swizz mountains and grazes even on the steepest, stoniest slopes. The black patches on its nose, eyes, ears, knees, hocks and feet and otherwise light woolly coats make it quite unmistakeable.
Zoom Info
voiceofnature:

Valais blacknosed sheep. Although the earliest mention of it dates back to 1400, this large, docile mountain sheep was first recognised as a separate breed in 1962. It has adapted particularly well to life in the high Swizz mountains and grazes even on the steepest, stoniest slopes. The black patches on its nose, eyes, ears, knees, hocks and feet and otherwise light woolly coats make it quite unmistakeable.
Zoom Info
voiceofnature:

Valais blacknosed sheep. Although the earliest mention of it dates back to 1400, this large, docile mountain sheep was first recognised as a separate breed in 1962. It has adapted particularly well to life in the high Swizz mountains and grazes even on the steepest, stoniest slopes. The black patches on its nose, eyes, ears, knees, hocks and feet and otherwise light woolly coats make it quite unmistakeable.
Zoom Info
voiceofnature:

Valais blacknosed sheep. Although the earliest mention of it dates back to 1400, this large, docile mountain sheep was first recognised as a separate breed in 1962. It has adapted particularly well to life in the high Swizz mountains and grazes even on the steepest, stoniest slopes. The black patches on its nose, eyes, ears, knees, hocks and feet and otherwise light woolly coats make it quite unmistakeable.
Zoom Info

voiceofnature:

Valais blacknosed sheep. Although the earliest mention of it dates back to 1400, this large, docile mountain sheep was first recognised as a separate breed in 1962. It has adapted particularly well to life in the high Swizz mountains and grazes even on the steepest, stoniest slopes. The black patches on its nose, eyes, ears, knees, hocks and feet and otherwise light woolly coats make it quite unmistakeable.

myhiphopmelody:

sourcedumal:

cradily:

drakeovograham:

Do y’all know how fucking sad this makes me? leave people alone. This literally made me cry. FUCKING LEAVE PEOPLE ALONE?! I hate this world. Too fucked up, even for me



you guys!!!!!!! this turned out to be a nice story for once!!!!! so many people were saying nice things about her that she ended up makin an instagram just to see them!!!

YAY!!!!!! I’m glad she got so much love and support!!!

Yay!Protect black girls man.

myhiphopmelody:

sourcedumal:

cradily:

drakeovograham:

Do y’all know how fucking sad this makes me? leave people alone. This literally made me cry. FUCKING LEAVE PEOPLE ALONE?! I hate this world. Too fucked up, even for me

you guys!!!!!!! this turned out to be a nice story for once!!!!! so many people were saying nice things about her that she ended up makin an instagram just to see them!!!

YAY!!!!!! I’m glad she got so much love and support!!!

Yay!
Protect black girls man.

Simba

Young cub, young cub
The wild is not for you.
You are for the wild

Seek not to be king, ruler of all
but king, ruler of you.

Do not limit yourself to castles for you have palaces within you.

Young cub, young cub
The wild is not for you.
You are for the wild

Know that you cannot change currents
but that you’re able to swim against them

Do not only search the rivers for fish, but for gold too.

Young cub, young cub
The wild is not for you.
You are for the wild

Be aware that your mane does not define your rawr
but that your rawr will become your name.

Do not think your thoughts too loud for whispers can be just as true.

Young cub, young cub
The wild is not for you.
You are for the wild

Khree Fearman (via wordupkhree)

  • me: what are taxes and how do I pay them?
  • school system: worry not
  • school system: mitochondria is the powerhouse of the cell
feminist-space:

mpreg-tony:

urulokid:

millika:

Who’s Alex?
Billboard demonstrating gender stereotypes as most people automatically assume that Alex is the boy.

Actually, I’ve studied design and advertising, and I can tell you that the reason people would look at this and immediately assume Alex is the boy is because, quite simply, the boy is the focal point of the ad.
English-speaking readers’ line of sight goes from left to right and up to down. This ad leads the viewer from the words MEET ALEX etc straight to the boy and then over and down to the girl. I didn’t even notice there was a set of parenthesis with words in them in the ad until I looked the fourth time. 
This is a fallacious confirmation bias, as anyone looking at it will assume Alex is the focal point (i.e. The Boy) and then if they’re perceptive they’ll notice the words at the bottom. Aha! Those damn gender stereotypes gotcha again! Except no, because the ad literally forces you to read it as “Alex is the boy” by the visual language and lines of sight. 
A better ad would have been structured from top to bottom instead of left to right, and wouldn’t have pushed the girl, the real subject of the ad (who, by the way, has been VISUALLY PUSHED OUT OF HER RIGHTFUL SPACE ON THE AD BY HER BROTHER) off to the corner as far away from her identifiers as possible. 
Here, I’ll make you a better ad.

Bam. Shitty stock photo but you get the point. If anyone sees this and assumes Alex is the boy, they don’t have the the ad layout to use as an excuse for their internalized gender shittery. Likewise, the ad isn’t actively trying to make you read it a certain way and THEN making you feel guilty for interpreting it the way they designed it to be. 

Thank got someone pointed this out… I didn’t have the energy to do it. 

Agreed with urulokid. And I certainly like urulokid’s version of the ad.

feminist-space:

mpreg-tony:

urulokid:

millika:

Who’s Alex?

Billboard demonstrating gender stereotypes as most people automatically assume that Alex is the boy.

Actually, I’ve studied design and advertising, and I can tell you that the reason people would look at this and immediately assume Alex is the boy is because, quite simply, the boy is the focal point of the ad.

English-speaking readers’ line of sight goes from left to right and up to down. This ad leads the viewer from the words MEET ALEX etc straight to the boy and then over and down to the girl. I didn’t even notice there was a set of parenthesis with words in them in the ad until I looked the fourth time. 

This is a fallacious confirmation bias, as anyone looking at it will assume Alex is the focal point (i.e. The Boy) and then if they’re perceptive they’ll notice the words at the bottom. Aha! Those damn gender stereotypes gotcha again! Except no, because the ad literally forces you to read it as “Alex is the boy” by the visual language and lines of sight. 

A better ad would have been structured from top to bottom instead of left to right, and wouldn’t have pushed the girl, the real subject of the ad (who, by the way, has been VISUALLY PUSHED OUT OF HER RIGHTFUL SPACE ON THE AD BY HER BROTHER) off to the corner as far away from her identifiers as possible. 

Here, I’ll make you a better ad.

image

Bam. Shitty stock photo but you get the point. If anyone sees this and assumes Alex is the boy, they don’t have the the ad layout to use as an excuse for their internalized gender shittery. Likewise, the ad isn’t actively trying to make you read it a certain way and THEN making you feel guilty for interpreting it the way they designed it to be. 

Thank got someone pointed this out… I didn’t have the energy to do it. 

Agreed with urulokid. And I certainly like urulokid’s version of the ad.

brownglucose:

Tinashe sounds exactly like Cassie. I get the whole, pretty, racially ambiguous girl from Cali that whisper sings aesthetic, it’s very popular right now but they all look and sound the same.